When you’re at the Daily Pint, enjoy playing a game while your downing your favorite brew, sipping a wee dram or enjoying any other drink you order.

Pool Tables

We have two pool tables…so you should always be able to get a game

Pool TablesWe thought you’d like to read a little history about pool…

The word “pool” means a collective bet, or ante. Many non-billiard games, such as poker, involve a pool but it was to pocket billiards that the name became attached. The term “poolroom” now means a place where pool is played, but in the 19th century a poolroom was a betting parlor for horse racing. Pool tables were installed so patrons could pass time between races. The two became connected in the public mind, but the unsavory connotation of “poolroom” came from the betting that took place there, not from billiards.

Eight-Ball was invented shortly after 1900; Straight Pool followed in 1910. Nine-Ball seems to have developed around 1920.

In the 1920’s, the poolroom was an environment in which men gathered to loiter, smoke, fight, bet, and play. The rooms of today bear no resemblance to those of the earlier times.

If you saw the movie, “The Hustler” released in 1961, you’ll remember this black-and-white film depicted the dark life of a pool hustler with Paul Newman in the title role. This movie sparked the opening of new pol rooms all over the country and for the remainder of the 60’s pool flourished until social concerns, the Vietnam War, and a desire for outdoor coeducational activities led to a decline in billiard interest.

In 1986, “The Color of Money”, the sequel to “The Hustler” with Paul Newman in the same role and Tom Cruise as an up-and-coming professional, brought the excitement of pool to a new generation. The result was the opening of “upscale” rooms catering to people whose senses would have been offended by the old rooms if they had ever seen them. This trend began slowly in 1987 and has since surged.

Table Shuffleboard

Don’t feel like a game of pool..try shuffleboard:

And now for some table shuffleboard trivia…Shuffle Board

Back in 15th Century England, folks played a game of sliding a “groat” (a large British coin of the day worth about four pence) down a table. The game was called shove groat and/or slide groat. Later, a silver penny was used and the name of the game became shove-penny and/or shovel-penny. The game was played by the young and old, and was a favorite pastime in the great country houses of Staffordshire, Winchester and Wiltshire.

While our Founding Fathers were busy putting together the makings of this great country, there were big shuffleboard matches being conducted throughout the colonies. Shuffleboard was popular among the English soldiers as well as the colonists.

The fame of the game spread, and soon it came upon the public scene in more ways that one. In 1848, in New Hanover, Pennsylvania, a case of “The State vs. John Bishop” to decide the question, “Is shuffleboard a game of chance or a game of skill?” Came up for trail. The judge ruled thus:

“Though the defendant kept a public gaming table, as charged, and though diverse persons played thereat and bet spirituous liquors on the game, the game was not a game of chance, but was altogether a game of skill.”

Shuffleboard made its was across the country. In 1904, Gentleman Jim Corbett, an avid player, had a tavern owner named Croll install a table in his Alamedia, California, pub. “Doc” Croll, his son, claimed it was the first shuffleboard in that part of the country.

World War II opened the “Swinging Forties” and shuffleboard really came into its own. The intrinsic appeal of the game – skill, diversity, competitiveness, availability to young and old, strong and disabled, the serious game, the fun game, offered the kind of release needed in those turbulent years.

Hollywood climbed on the shuffleboard bandwagon and took it up, at first, as a source of good publicity. Then when the pin-up girls and bandleaders and actors discovered they really liked the game, shuffleboards found their way into the studios and homes of the stars. People like Betty Grable, Harry James, Merv Griffin, Alan Ladd; all had their own shuffleboards.

Shuffleboard grew to its greatest height in the 1950s. Most major shuffleboard manufactures sponsored nationwide shuffleboard tournaments. These were the biggest tournaments ever held; one had 576 teams participating.

Fierce competition among major manufactures and suppliers, lack of uniform rules and organization, the inability to gain sponsorship of the sport, and general internal strife in all facets of shuffleboard, led to a demise of the game in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Some feared it was damaged beyond “repair,” but others invested their time, efforts and talents to breath life into the sport that they had loved. That dedication paid off, by the mid-‘80s, shuffleboard experienced a revival, a revival that has extended and strengthened in the ‘90s.

While organization, cooperation and communication have been key elements in the revival of shuffleboard; probably the most important factor has been an almost universal realization in The World of Shuffleboard that new young shooters will be the continued lifelines of the sport. Across the nation, established shooters have made it their top priority to help novice players develop their talents and nurture their enthusiasm for league and tournament play. As long as that remains a priority, shuffleboard will continue to grow.

Foosball or Table Football

and last but not least…our final game…foosball or as we say in England, table football.

Say “foosball,” you’re putting a foot in your mouth-a German foot!

Foosball is the American corruption of fussball (pronounced the same), the German word for soccer-literally foot plus ball. While the sport has the more formal name of table soccer, to the American players who love it, it’s foosball, or just foos.

Table Foosball

Unfortunately, the origins of the game are not as easy to trace as those of its name. Like many games, it is quite possible that variations of foosball developed in different countries over roughly the same time period. Since organized soccer first entered the sports scene in the 1860s, the invention of soccer’s table version can be safely dated sometime afterward, probably in the late 1800s. The earliest United States patent for a foosball table was registered in 1901, but it is generally agreed that foosball, like soccer, originated in western Europe.

Foosball is played all over the world. It can be found in the Middle East, North Africa, South America, Australia, and Tahiti, as well as in Europe, the United Kingdom, and North America. Two foreign countries who recently expressed the desire to participate in American tournament competition are.Argentina and Japan. Don’t be surprised if you see teams from these two nations at the World Championships in the near future.

A recent study revealed that every week 1.9 million people play a game of foosball-in the United States alone…if you play foosball at The Daily Pint…you’re one of them!

Jukebox

Jukebox

While playing you’re favorite game, don’t forget to load up the jukebox to listen to your favorite songs.

Not much we can say about Jukeboxes…they came into use in the US around 1940 and have remained here ever since.

Nothing wrong in listening to some golden oldies or newer music from your favorite genre while you’re hanging out at the “Pint.